Modern Art Museum

Modern Art Museum

The Future of Earth from Space, Oxford Background   5th August 2017 What We Did – The workshop at Modern Art Oxford was  an excellent opportunity to engage with a younger audience which really tested the limits of the materials we had prepared. – The workshop primarily enabled adults and children to understand what is happening in the UK Space industry and an understanding of what role the Satellite Applications Catapult plays in this industry. – During the workshop at Modern Art Oxford, Families constructed and deconstructed the UBO satellites and discovered their potential user cases. Having engaged with artist Aleksandra Mir, who curated the space-themed exhibition ‘Space Tapestry: Earth Observation & Human Spaceflight’ at Modern Art Oxford and Tate Liverpool, the curator of Modern Art Oxford got in touch to discuss the possibility of a joint event with the Satellite Applications Catapult. This represented a very good opportunity to engage and reach new audiences in the context of a relevant exhibition and spread the word that you don’t have to be an astronaut to be part of the space industry. Expertise can range and this range was represented in different engaging workshop materials for families, children and adults educating them about Earth Observation, Satellite Communication and Space in general and how they impact our daily lives. Thank you so much for a really interesting, family-friendly event. Really patient explanations – pitched at just the right level for the kids. Friendly, helpful staff, interesting hands-on activities Excellent, well executed lovely ideas and people running the workshop I found it interesting and suitable for all ages Fabulous! My son enjoyed it...
World Space Week

World Space Week

World Space Week, Harwell Background   7th October 2016 Remote Sensing was the theme as the Satellite Applications Catapult welcomed 60 students from around the country to take part in a series of activities all in celebration of World Space Week. With support from Catapult Ambassadors, staff and the National Space Academy, the students were treated to a series of talks and activities highlighting the role satellites and, in particular remote sensing, has in their everyday lives. The day’s activities included constructing a real life microsatellite called UBO, measuring the speed of light using a microwave and chocolate and building a temperature sensor using an Arduino microcomputer; with each activity providing the students with analogue examples of the science and technology involved in remote sensing. The day helped to showcase the work of the Satellite Application Catapult and to promote space careers to the students, particularly with the support of the Satellite Applications Catapult STEM Ambassadors, who each have a unique pathway of their own into the space sector. Chris Duff – STEM Engagement Manager   World Space Week is the celebration of two monumental events in the history of the space programme. Held between the 4 and 10 October each year, the week celebrates the launch of the first official satellite into orbit Sputnik on 4 October 1957, and the ratification of the Outer Space Treaty on 10 October 1967. What We Did – The “Satellite days” were an excellent opportunity for the Polish and British aerospace business to meet and discuss trends and cooperation opportunities. – The days primarily enabled CubeSats, based on the technology and knowledge...
Mexico

Mexico

Outreach Workshop, Mexico Background   29th-2nd November 2016 The main purpose of the UBO PocketQube workshop in Mexico was to provide hands on experience of real satellite hardware and educate people around satellite applications and mission concepts in advance of the subsequent training on the ClydeSpace Nanobed flatsat. The PocketQube is smaller than the average satellite. However, the kits remain fully representative of a full size satellite system for a fraction of the cost. This allows individuals to develop on our kits, while ensuring all skills developed in the processes are fully transferable to larger cube satellite missions, or indeed any satellite as all will contain the same basic subsystems. The day started with assembly of the satellites, an important aspect and one largely uncovered by other training programs. Although the construction has been designed to be as intuitive as possible, the assembly process forces participants to consider design restraints that might affect payloads and mission selections such as the weight and physical dimensions. What We Did – Introduced Clydespace Nanobed using what had been learnt from building and coding UBO – Educated participants on how orbit simulation is an important way of testing satellite payloads – Inspired new mission concepts from individuals after introducing missions made for UBO As part of the day students took photos with the camera payload on their completed UBO’s. To do this they needed to convert hexadecimal data from the camera payload to something view able (an jpeg image). Results can be seen on the right. In later workshops we hope to use the camera payload differently and use its infra-red capabilities. The...
Harwell

Harwell

Nanosat Weekend, Harwell Background   26th-27th September 2015 This event was a proof of concept exercise showing the developments of the satellite from the prior workshop done in Poland. The satellite workshop weekend gave participants an incredible opportunity to experience first-hand the entire process of satellite development. Starting with a box of components, the teams assembled their UBO PocketQube satellites in just a few hours. This included connecting all the electronic sub systems together, such as the On Board Computer and the Electrical Power System, but also structural components such as the main chassis and mounting the solar panels. Having completed the main build, the teams went on to run a series of functional checks to ensure their hardware was operating correctly. The afternoon, and much of the second day were spent developing mission concepts and programming the satellites to carry out tasks for the upcoming balloon flight. Here the teams had the freedom to design their own experiments utilising the sensors and modules available on the satellites, and write their own software to collect this data and transmit it to the ground. After lunch, the completed satellites were bolted to a platform, and a large tethered helium balloon was inflated. As the platform ascended, teams began communicating with their satellites through a radio link and a ground station attached to their laptops. Some teams were commanding the satellites to carry out different tasks, some were downloading telemetry data from the satellite over the radio, and several even managed to transmit some image data from the on board camera. After the flight the satellites were recovered and any data...
Poland

Poland

Satellite Days, Poland Background   10th-11th December 2014 The Satellite Applications Catapult is an independent innovation and technology company, created to foster growth across the economy through the exploitation of space. Part of this mission manifested itself into a project to build a CubeSat, based on the technology and knowledge of the Satellite Applications Catapult. This mission enabled a two-day workshop, organised for students from all over Poland, experts from Satellite Applications Catapult provided their knowledge and the technology needed to construct the cutting-edge satellites. The “Satellite days “ were intended to familiarize the participants with up-to-date and progressive space technology that is not usually available to Polish students, and to inspire them to start their careers in the space industry. The event corresponds with the UK Trade & Investment’s “Innovation is GREAT” initiative, which supports collaborative research, development and the commercialization of new technology solutions between Great Britain and the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. The CEE Region is a crucial direction to develop the science and business cooperation of the Polish and British space industry. Our objectives are convergent – Poland and the United Kingdom want to be actively involved in space exploration. Thanks to this cooperation we will be able to achieve much more, and there is a lot worth fighting for. The space technology market in 2008 was worth 160 billion pounds, and in 2030 it is estimated to reach 400 billion pounds. Robin Barnett – Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Poland.   Robin Barnett, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Poland, joined by professor Mark Banaszkiewicz, the Director of the Center for Space Research, and Chris...